1956 Ford Thunderbird 3 Spd Automatic Transmission


Description


Now, what would be the ideal drive train? Well, that depends on your driving habits. The Ford- o-Matic was by far the most preferred, probably by more than 9-to-1. The 3- speed stick was a primitive affair, with no synchro's in 1st gear, making it a bear to drive for anyone without considerable experience with a standard shift.

Now, what's the best color for a 1956 T-Bird? Of course, that's a matter of personal taste, but the today many T- Bird aficionados prefer Sage Green, because it is unusual, and yet best captures the style and spirit of the baby Bird. It is an iconic Fifty's shade, but contemporary enough to look very cool today. (Naturally, a Green and White interior best complements this striking color scheme, especially when the car is capped off with a white convertible top and a white hard top.)

Next comes the question of tops. The baby birds were furnished either with a soft top, a hardtop or both. The soft top is a given; you can't have a convertible without one. But the hardtop transforms the car into a closed coupe, which makes it far more usable in the winter months. No wonder the price guides add a significant bump for a car equipped with both tops. By the way, in the 56 Ford added the porthole to the hardtop, another 50's iconic styling touch. Ford also offered the hard tops in contrasting colors, usually white, which great adds to the car's rich look.

There are 2 other appearance options that can "make" a car: wheels and tires. Wide white walls are a must, Next, are the wheels. This car is equipped with 5 correct chrome wire wheel hubcaps, which, again, in my opinion, "light up" the car.

Now let's talk about options. This is a "loaded" car, with every factory option except power windows, which often are more trouble than they're worth. (You can easily reach across the seat to open the passenger window.) There's Power Brakes, Power Steering, Town & Country Radio, Power Seats, Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission, 3 (three) Tops (including a matching Sage Green Tonneau cover which closes the cockpit quickly without the need to erect the top), Chrome Wire Wheel Ford Hubcaps, wide whitewall tires (5), Engine Dress-up Kit (with chrome air cleaner and polished, fined valve covers), and, best of all, period correct Air Conditioning!

Nice as the car sounds on paper, the single most important criterion in selecting any collector car is condition. This Bird has received an expert frame off, nut and bolt restoration from Amos Minter, renowned T- Bird restorer and expert. Amos does cars for many budgets; this one cost $66,500 with receipts to prove it. This means that this car is at the high range of his work, with every single part down to the last nut, bolt and screw addressed in the restoration. Everything. The exterior, interior, engine compartment, trunk and undercarriage look factory fresh, correct and flawless. The drivetrain has been completely rebuilt, which includes engine and transmission, as well as suspension components, brakes, lines, you name it. The paint on the car is over five years old and shows no signs of deterioration or defects, which is preferable to buying a fresh paint job where hidden defects may appear after you own the car.
1956 Ford Thunderbird 3 Spd Automatic Transmission
$ 17,500.00
Used
Sell
Now, what would be the ideal drive train? Well, that depends on your driving habits. The Ford- o-Matic was by far the most preferred, probably by more than 9-to-1. The 3- speed stick was a primitive affair, with no synchro's in 1st gear, making it a bear to drive for anyone without considerable experience with a standard shift.

Now, what's the best color for a 1956 T-Bird? Of course, that's a matter of personal taste, but the today many T- Bird aficionados prefer Sage Green, because it is unusual, and yet best captures the style and spirit of the baby Bird. It is an iconic Fifty's shade, but contemporary enough to look very cool today. (Naturally, a Green and White interior best complements this striking color scheme, especially when the car is capped off with a white convertible top and a white hard top.)

Next comes the question of tops. The baby birds were furnished either with a soft top, a hardtop or both. The soft top is a given; you can't have a convertible without one. But the hardtop transforms the car into a closed coupe, which makes it far more usable in the winter months. No wonder the price guides add a significant bump for a car equipped with both tops. By the way, in the 56 Ford added the porthole to the hardtop, another 50's iconic styling touch. Ford also offered the hard tops in contrasting colors, usually white, which great adds to the car's rich look.

There are 2 other appearance options that can "make" a car: wheels and tires. Wide white walls are a must, Next, are the wheels. This car is equipped with 5 correct chrome wire wheel hubcaps, which, again, in my opinion, "light up" the car.

Now let's talk about options. This is a "loaded" car, with every factory option except power windows, which often are more trouble than they're worth. (You can easily reach across the seat to open the passenger window.) There's Power Brakes, Power Steering, Town & Country Radio, Power Seats, Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission, 3 (three) Tops (including a matching Sage Green Tonneau cover which closes the cockpit quickly without the need to erect the top), Chrome Wire Wheel Ford Hubcaps, wide whitewall tires (5), Engine Dress-up Kit (with chrome air cleaner and polished, fined valve covers), and, best of all, period correct Air Conditioning!

Nice as the car sounds on paper, the single most important criterion in selecting any collector car is condition. This Bird has received an expert frame off, nut and bolt restoration from Amos Minter, renowned T- Bird restorer and expert. Amos does cars for many budgets; this one cost $66,500 with receipts to prove it. This means that this car is at the high range of his work, with every single part down to the last nut, bolt and screw addressed in the restoration. Everything. The exterior, interior, engine compartment, trunk and undercarriage look factory fresh, correct and flawless. The drivetrain has been completely rebuilt, which includes engine and transmission, as well as suspension components, brakes, lines, you name it. The paint on the car is over five years old and shows no signs of deterioration or defects, which is preferable to buying a fresh paint job where hidden defects may appear after you own the car.

Additional information

Make: Ford
Model: Thunderbird
Year: 1956
Doors: 2
Mileage: 71,561
Transmission: Automatic
Interior Color: Green Leather
Exterior Color: Green
Vehicle Identification Number: M6FH159711
United States, Washington, Seattle
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